Sunday, November 1, 2015

A modern design exhibit in an ancient temple in Tokyo, lunch at my favourite yakiniku restaurant. And about Otawara steaks, the most expensive beef in the world.

Artwork in an ancient temple:
These are photos from a modern exhibit on design,
done by young artists and designers,
in a famous Tokyo temple.

In Tokyo today, living a #Travelife, the first order of the day was a yakiniku lunch at one of my favorite joints. Within the mid-price range, this is probably the best yakiniku restaurant in the city as the food is really so good.

There's a shabu-shabu style yakiniku that's not on their menu, but you can order it if you know about it. I never eat anything else when I'm here.

That's the temple we went to after the yakiniku lunch,
living a #Travelife...

Of course, at the very high-end of the food chain are some fabulously expensive upscale yakiniku restaurants. These are lovely too.

But IMHO, yakiniku is one of those Japanese foods you should stick to the mid-price ranged restaurants for.

Scroll down to read more...


LAW OF DIMINISHING RETURNS
APPLIES TO YAKINIKU TOO

Once you're paying about 15,000 yen per person for yakiniku, you're maximising the restaurant's potential and it's all diminishing returns after that

Meaning the quality of the meat in the 15,000 yen range and the 30,000 yen and above range aren't very different, and basically you're just paying for the amount of fat in the meat -- and you know how fat is never a good thing. There's really just so much you can eat of fat, even with the best marbled beef in the world.

So I prefer to stick to the tried-and-tested mid-priced range of restaurants for yakiniku.

Artwork in an ancient temple:
These are photos from a modern exhibit on design,
done by young artists and designers,
in a famous Tokyo temple.

THE LAW OF DIMINISHING RETURNS
APPLIES TO WAGYU STEAKS TOO.
AND ABOUT OTAWARA BEEF STEAKS
AT US$1000 PER PERSON

Wagyu steaks are basically the same as well.  Yakiniku, by the way, are smaller and thinner cuts of meat compared to steaks, which are the same in Japan as elsewhere, although usually smaller in volume.

There's a restaurant in Tokyo that became very famous for serving the most expensive steaks in the world, called Otawara beef. Dinner at this restaurant is about US$1000 for the top steak.

Lots of people with cash to burn go to this Otawara steak restaurant at least once in their life for a meal here, but I've never heard of anyone going twice yet.

Artwork in an ancient temple:
These are photos from a modern exhibit on design,
done by young artists and designers,
in a famous Tokyo temple.

THE FUSS ABOUT OTAWARA STEAKS

Unless you're just gunning for the bragging rights of having eaten the world's most expensive steak, there's really not much enjoyment in the US$1000 steak that you can't have for about US$150. 

US$150 at the meatshop for a steak you'll cook at home and about US$300 for a steak at the restaurant is just as good as that US$1000 steak. In fact, the cheaper version has less fat so you also get satiated less easily

Artwork in an ancient temple:
These are photos from a modern exhibit on design,
done by young artists and designers,
in a famous Tokyo temple.

JUST ONCE.
NEXT TIME I'M BUYING AN ISSEY MIYAKE DRESS INSTEAD.

Being a foodie, I had to try this most expensive steak in the world for myself, of course, and someone was kind enough to take me.

But I could only finish this rather oily, expensive piece of beef by gulping down copious amounts of red wine to cut the fat


And while someone was just ever so gallantly taking me so it certainly wasn't my place to complain then and there, I couldn't help thinking about what other things I would prefer to buy over this US$1000 per person meal, living a #Travelife.

PS: These are photos from a modern design exhibit I visited yesterday, done by young designers in the hallways of an ancient temple in Mita, Tokyo, for a real juxtaposition of old and new. We went to see this exhibit after the yakiniku lunch, and I thought they would look fresher in this blog than endless photos of sliced meat...











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