Sunday, February 23, 2014

Great lava stone-cooked wagyu at Magosaburo in the Fort Strip


Last night, just as I was about to step out for dinner, I got a call on my mobile from an old friend who'd dropped by the Travelife Magazine office earlier in the week.

At the office, we'd started talking about food, for some reason, and I'd told him about two very delicious new places serving wagyu in the city.

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MY RECOMMENDATION 
FOR REASONABLE WAGYU

So last night, he said: "What was the name of that restaurant you were recommending in the Fort? The one that serves good wagyu?"

It's Magosaburo, which is a Japanese nouvelle cuisine restaurant that's been operating in the Fort for about seven months now.



I'd just gone over the holidays and had been pretty impressed to return fairly often in a very busy Travelife.

Magosaburo serves very good food at a reasonable price point -- which is why I like recommending it to friends.

THE MOST IMPRESSIVE DISHES

I'd liked everything I'd ordered here so far, and one or two dishes had even blown me away.



One of them was the wagyu sirloin which is cooked to order in front of you on a lava stone. It's honest-to-goodness Japanese beef, imported from Kyushu, and it's got just the right amount of fat.

This isn't the top-grade wagyu of Japan, but it's good enough -- and at the price they serve it at Magosaburo, you might even call it a bargain.

THE SECRET TO EATING WAGYU



Besides, between you and me, and the other one million-plus people who read this Travelife Magazine blog, the top grade Japanese beef is fantastic, of course, but only in small servings.

In reality, it's way too fatty to have an entire steak to yourself, no matter how tender and juicy it is.

REMEMBERING A KOBE BEEF MEAL
WITH PRESIDENT CORY AQUINO

Thinking about this reminded of an instance some years back, when I accompanied former president Corazon Aquino and her daughters on a visit to Kobe.

Our hosts wanted to know in advance what we wished to eat in Kobe. It was Kobe beef, of course.


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Well, the owner of a Kobe beef farm hosted us for a meal and served the very best Kobe beef in the land. It was so marbled that it was practically white.

It was also meltingly good.

I didn't even need a knife to slice it, and it cut in one go. But I left about 60% of my steak on my plate, in spite of the fact that Kobe beef is just about one of my favorite things in this world.

WHAT TO ORDER IF YOU PLAN TO EAT EVERYTHING



Morale of the story: If you really want a whole steak, you should aim for the middle-grade wagyu which is suitably marbled, but not too much that you feel like you're eating pure fat.

This comfortable middle is what Magosaburo serves.

So anyway, I told my friend last night about Magosaburo, as he wanted to bring his significant other to a very good wagyu restaurant -- and he remembered our conversation on Monday.




GREAT VALUE AND A VERY GOOD MEAL

There are one or two other places that serve real Japanese wagyu -- meaning beef from Japan, rather than just Japanese-style beef from Australia or the US --  better than this.

And what I mean by this is that the wagyu served at these one or two other restaurants is probably a higher grade.

But the price skyrockets significantly at these places as well.

So, in comparison, I recommend Magosaburo without hesitation for value and taste.




WHAT A COINCIDENCE

I then said to my friend: "In fact, that's where I'm going tonight."

Yes, I was hankering for some lava stone-cooked wagyu myself -- for the second time this week, actually -- and that's where I was also headed last night, for another relaxing weekend dinner in my never-ending, and never-endingly eventful Travelife.

And, indeed, there they were across us at the restaurant, enjoying the lava stone-cooked wagyu too.





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