Saturday, September 28, 2013

Pablo Picasso's Guernica, and other masterpieces at the Reina Sofia Museum in Madrid



One Sunday morning in Madrid, living a Travelife, we decided to visit the Reina Sofia Museum, which was just a short stroll from our hotel.

We all wanted a bit of culture and exercise anyway, before a long and liquid lunch.



GREAT MODERN ART

I had been to the Reina Sofia many times before, on previous visits to Madrid

But I never miss an opportunity to see great modern art when I can.  

The Prado, which is the most famous art museum in Madrid, and certainly one of the most famous in the world, houses older artworks. If you want to see 20th century masterpieces, then you must visit the Reina Sofia Museum.



THE HORRORS OF WAR
AS DEPICTED BY PICASSO

I also wanted to revisit the Guernica, the masterpiece of Pablo Picasso, which is about the senseless bombing by the German military of a Spanish village full mostly of women and children.



The Guernica is the most famous work in the Reina Sofia, a former hospital that has been turned into a very cool museum with a scenic elevator.

OTHER MASTERS AT THE REINA SOFIA

But it has other beautiful works as well, by masters of the 20th century

For example, it has an excellent collection of the works of Spanish master surrealist Salvador Dali, an artist almost as famous as Picasso, but not among my favorites. I like Picasso's works infinitely more.


The Reina Sofia also has wonderful paintings by Joan Miro, Antoni Tapies, and Juan Gris.

However, my favorite works at the Reina Sofia are still the works of Picasso unconnected to war. 

Pablo Picasso had a penchant for painting all the women he was involved or in love with, so I have seen paintings of all his women in museums all over the world. At the Reina Sofia, there is a series of very interesting paintings of his last wife, Jacqueline. The photo below belongs to this series.

A BIT OF EUROPEAN HISTORY AS WELL

As we only had one morning to see the highlights of the Reina Sofia, we hired a guide for the visit, to explain the nuances of the best works. 

When she began explaining some works in relation to Spanish history, she was very surprised that I knew my European history well enough to ask follow–up questions. 



I love history, and I especially find European history terribly fascinating, so this was a treat to be able to link works with historical events and figures.

It was the perfect way to spend a nice morning in Madrid, living a never–ending, and neverendingly eventful Travelife.


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