Monday, August 12, 2013

A fantastic yakiniku restaurant in Tokyo's Meguro-ku




Over the weekend in Tokyo, living a Travelife, we went to an excellent, local yakiniku restaurant in the outskirts of the city, that I wouldn't hesitate to recommend to friends visiting Japan.

Someone had taken me there.

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TAKE 2 FOR YAKINIKU

The previous night, he'd been to this same restaurant with a famous sommelier from Paris and a high-powered Tokyo television executive.

They'd drunk -- and gotten drunk perhaps -- for two hours on garage wines this famous sommelier had brought back from France, just for the occasion.



After the wine-tasting with very little food, the television executive, who must know his way around these kinds of excellent and reasonably-priced restaurants, took them to this yakiniku restaurant.

24 HOURS DREAMING OF YAKINIKU



My friend couldn't get enough of this yakiniku restaurant, and he spent the next 24 hours dreaming about the wonderful meat he'd had over dinner -- and when he'd be able to go back there next.

And when it was time for us to go to dinner, this was where he wanted to go.

THERE GOES THE DETOX



I was trying to cut down on meat, actually, in a feeble attempt to do some kind of detox.

But I agreed to go to this yakiniku place anyway, even if I am not really a yakiniku kind of person.

Wow, this was so good.

MODERN INTERIORS



First, the place itself is modern and nice.

So not your typical yakiniku restaurant.

TALK ABOUT VARIETY



Second, they had the most variety of meat for grilling that I've ever seen -- and every part of the cow is meticulously explained so you know what you're ordering and getting.

I marveled at how a pretty compact restaurant could offer such a wide variety of meats. As in truly amazing variety, and everything was so well-explained.

Now I know more about the parts of a cow than I'll ever want to know...

We ate the yakiniku with these sesame leaves...


ONE COW AT A TIME...

"They buy an entire cow each time, and that's why they can offer cuts of meat you'll never see elsewhere," my friend explained.

And, boy, was he right.

THE PRICIEST ISN'T NECESSARILY THE BEST



Interestingly, one of the things we ordered was a cut of beef called sankaku. It was the most expensive item on the menu. 

This was okay for one slice, but I simply couldn't eat the rest of it, as it was way too fatty.

Strips of seaweed with sesame seeds for grilling


It kind of reminded me of the time I had Otawara steak, which is supposed to be the most expensive piece of steak in the world. Someone had taken me, and I just couldn't finish it because it was so fatty.

Yes, I had the most expensive steak in the world, and I left about 1/3 of it on my plate.

HEAVEN ISN'T THAT EXPENSIVE



So now I know what I really like.

Something that's not necessarily the priciest thing on the menu. But it's flavorful and really good.

There was a middle-range piece of fatty meat called misuji which I could have gone on eating the whole night. It had just the right amount of fat, and when I dipped it into the home-made yakiniku sauce, it was simply heaven.

Just goes to show that some of the best things in life need not be the most expensive, in a never-ending, and never-endingly eventful Travelife.




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