Travelife TV

Our valued partner

Our valued partner

Thursday, October 23, 2014

Flamenco dancer Isabel Bayon performed the Caprichos de Tiempo (The Whims of Time) in Manila yesterday


Yesterday, in rainy Tokyo, living a Travelife, I had a very nice lunch at a two-star Michelin restaurant with someone from Manila.

I chose this restaurant because it's relatively unknown and under-the-radar in spite of receiving two stars. 

Scroll down to read more...




A STARRY, STARRY CITY

Tokyo has the most restaurant stars, after all, so Michelin two-star restaurants are almost as numerous as truly good ramen restaurants.

I was curious to see how this restaurant would fare vs. the more famous two-star establishments.

TRADITIONAL JAPANESE CUISINE
AT ITS BEST



The food is very traditional Japanese, but it was mindblowingly excellent in a very subdued way. There are no fireworks in Japanese cuisine.

Just tranquility and a quiet enjoyment.



I will write more about this little restaurant soon as I so enjoyed the food.

The meal was simple and yet creative and truly delicious, even in a city full of delicious, and even in a never-endingly delicious Travelife.

Scroll down to read more...
-------------------------------------------




-------------------------------------------

A PERFORMANCE BY
FLAMENCO STAR ISABEL BAYON


Meanwhile, in Manila, Spanish flamenco star Isabel Bayon performed an equally mind-blowing flamenco show entitled the Caprichos de Tiempo (The Whims of Time) under the auspices of the Embassy of Spain.

This show reportedly took Manila's flamenco lovers overs by storm.

Isabel Bayon was greatly praised for her artistry, grace and soulful dancing.



I am so sorry I missed this riveting performance as I am a big fan of Spanish culture, and especially of the flamenco.

Just look at these lovely photos and you can tell that this show is not just your usual flamenco show.



Wednesday, October 22, 2014

More on the best beauty gadgets and devices sold in Japan



Since posting a short entry several days ago about the best beauty products in Japan, I've been deluged by messages asking exactly what these top 3 beauty gadgets are.

I have three gadgets from Tokyo, bought at different times, and all three beauty gadgets happen to be ranked as the top sellers by Japan's cosmeceuticals industry.

And as you know, Japanese consumers take skin care very seriously.

Scroll down to read more...




READ MORE ABOUT THEM SOON
IN TRAVELIFE MAGAZINE

I purposely didn't mention exactly what these are, as we are going to feature them in the upcoming December-January issue of Travelife Magazine, the leading travel & lifestyle publication.

Two of the devices in particular are portable, and great for bringing on a never-endingly eventful Travelife. It's like bring a spa with you wherever you go in the world.

This isn't paid publicity either, as I didn't get a sample device to try out.

-------------------------------------------


-------------------------------------------


WHAT A NICE BIRTHDAY GIFT

So, yes, I paid good money for two of the devices and someone in Tokyo very kindly gave me the third device just last weekend as a birthday gift. 

Travelife Magazine is all about real travellers, real consumers, great stories.


Scroll down to read more...
-------------------------------------------




-------------------------------------------

TRIED AND TESTED BY MILLIONS

The good things about Japanese beauty gadgets and devices are that they are nicely designed to be easy-to-use (as Japanese consumers are the most finicky in the world) and the latest ones out on the market, with state-of-the-art technology,  seem to really work enough to satisfy millions of consumers.

Two of the gadgets in particular have sold millions so far in Japan, and a lot of people swear by them.

Read more about them soon in Travelife Magazine. Real travellers, real consumers, great stories.








Tuesday, October 21, 2014

Two Michelin stars for lunch in Tokyo today. And how Tokyo is the new Hong Kong.



In a previous blog entry, I've already written about the ultra-secret list of Tokyo's truly great restaurants.

These are the kinds of places that foreign food reviewers and inspectors can never get into because of a couple of factors.

The factors include the secrecy surrounding these places, the language barrier, and the fact that you need a regular customer to take you.

Scroll down to read more...



NO ENGLISH. NO PUBLICITY.

So even if you're some foodie tourist from overseas who's flush with lots of cash, places like these are generally closed off. The chefs hate publicity and not a word of English is spoken or written.

In most cases, there's no menu and no price list.

Basically, you don't know how much lunch or dinner will eventually cost, or what you'll eat. And if you have to ask about the price, you're not supposed to be there -- or at least, this is how these places think.


THE SECRET LIST OF
TOKYO'S BEST RESTAURANTS

I like these places, of course, as these constitute the ultimate bragging rights in a city that knows its food inside out.

Lots of people can go to the places made famous by the Michelin Guide or the S. Pellegrino as long as they reserve with enough lead time or go through the proper channels.

But that's not at all the case for many of the places in the ultra-secret list created and constantly updated by some of the most serious foodies in Japan.


Scroll down to read more...
-------------------------------------------



-------------------------------------------

I LIKE A COMBINATION OF BOTH

Personally, I like to mix both.

I so like the Michelin three-star and two-star restaurants because most of them do give you a truly great meal.




And I also look at the S. Pellegrino list when I travel because they tend to pick restaurants heavy on experimental and cutting-edge cuisine -- and sometimes, that's just great for an out-of-the-box experience.

So, depending on my mood and who I'm with, I tend to adjust my preferences and use the local favourites and the internationally famous restaurants in combination.

TOKYO IS THE NEW HONG KONG


Since the weekend, Tokyo has become the new Manila, which is also why I'm here, to play Ms. Hospitality to so many friends and family coming over for autumn holidays. T

he city is so overrun by people from Manila, in fact, that I can't walk through one luxury hotel without hearing Tagalog from every angle.

"Actually, Tokyo is the new Hong Kong," the Travel Companion said to me, before I left or Tokyo last weekend -- meaning that everyone is flying as frequently to Tokyo now as they used to do to Hong Kong. 

Scroll down to read more...
-------------------------------------------




-------------------------------------------


The Travel Companion is flying out to Tokyo soon, too, for our holiday in Hokkaido coming up. We're going on a big food trip with a couple of things thrown in.

Yesterday, too, a couple of my Tokyo friends said they bumped into a couple of my Manila friends in central Tokyo, walking on the streets or sitting in coffee shops, taking a break.

That's how saturated Tokyo is this week with people from Manila.

AN UNDER-THE-RADAR TWO-STAR MICHELIN
FOR LUNCH TODAY

And today, I'm taking one of my visitors from Manila to a very Japanese lunch because this was the specific request.

If I had a choice, it would have been L'Osier or Chateau Restaurant Joel Robuchon, because I think these two restaurants in Tokyo serve some of the best French meals outside of France, with the exception of Caprice, the French restaurant of the Four Seasons Hong Kong.

Caprice of the Four Seasons Hong Kong has been my great favourite ever since it first opened many years ago, way before it became famous and received its Michelin stars. I was among the first people to eat here.

Scroll down to read more...



NOTHING BUT JAPANESE

But as everyone from Manila wants nothing but Japanese, for today's lunch, I chose a little-known but very well-regarded (by the locals) two-star Michelin restaurant with nothing but a small counter.

No English, no credit cards, and pretty hard to find.

Let you know later how that goes, on just another wonderful day in my never-ending, and never-endingly eventful Travelife.